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Environmental Health

  • About Us

        
     

    Head of Division:  Professor Hanna-Andrea Rother BA MA PhD Michigan State

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    Welcome to the Division of Environmental Health

     

    The Environmental Health Division commenced in 2014.  According to the World Health Organization, environmental factors account for approximately one third of the global burden of disease, with children under five carrying the brunt.  The key objective of the Environmental Health Division is to develop capacity in Low and Middle Income Countries, particularly Africa, to address environmental health risks and reduce the resulting burden of disease. ​​​​​We do this through a post graduate programme in Pesticide Risk Management, teaching seminars and supervising PhD and MPH students in Environmental Health, training of government professionals addressing environmental health risks, and building capacity through innovative electronic forums and networking.

    Environmental health is the study of how environmental factors can harm and impact on human health, as well as how to identify, prevent and manage such effects. The Division of Environmental Health (DEH) offers a selection of activities to facilitate addressing environmental health, particularly in Low and Middle Income Countries, from teaching, research to community and government engagement.  The DEH offers students and professionals post graduate and capacity building training and skills development for application to diverse environments.  Our primary research informs and contributes to our active involvement with national and international policies.

    We invite you to contact us and review our activities which range from:

    • Undergraduate Teaching
    • Post-graduate Teaching
    • Service support and engagement
    • Research
    • Recent Publications
     

    Contact Information:

    Division of Environmental Health
    School of Public Health and Family Medicine
    Faculty of Health Sciences
    University of Cape Town
    OBSERVATORY
    7925
    South Africa
     

    Administrative Assistant
    Tel: +27 21 404 7661
    Email:  environmentalhealth@uct.ac.za / dprm@uct.ac.za

  • Undergraduate Teaching

    Environmental Health Seminars

    The Division provides teaching on the 1st year’s course ‘Becoming a Health Professional’, offered to all students in the Faculty of Health Sciences. The seminar introduces students to the concept of environmental health, including exposure history taking, as it fits in the social determinants of health framework.

    The Division also delivers seminars to 4th-year medical students in the ‘Health in Context’ course. The environmental health teaching focuses on equipping students with skills to be able to diagnose environment-related diseases through environmental exposure history taking and advise patients on prevention measures.

    Climate Change and Health Seminars

    These are offered to the following UG students by means of a class lecture, related readings and assessment by means of a short essay question (yr 3) and EOB exam question (yr 4):

    • year 1 (BHP course, related to the Environmental & social determinants of health), 
    • year 3 (Critical Health Humanities in BaDr course, specifically the impacts of global and local environmental change on diabetes & NCDs, PBL case 17)
    • year 4 (Health in Context  course, specifically the role of health professionals in protecting health from climate change impacts 

     

    Lecturers

    Prof Hanna-Andrea Rother
    Ms Rebecca Mlelwa
    Mr James Irlam
    Prof Aqiel Dalvie

  • Postgraduate Teaching

    Post Graduate Diploma in Pesticide Risk Management (DPRM)

    The DPRM Programme is a two-year part-time flexible learning programme (large distance learning component) targeting professionals in the field of pesticide and chemicals risk management. It includes a mandatory two-week residential session at UCT at the beginning of the two-year cycle. There will be substantial requirements for homework in the form of assignments and project related work, expected self-directed learning and regular distance communication between students and lecturers extending over the two years. 

    Programme Convenor: Prof Hanna-Andrea Rother

    Contact Information
    Direct all enquiries to the Division Administrator, dprm@uct.ac.za

    Further Details
    Download the DPRM Flyer and Programme Brochure for more details.


    Diploma in Pesticide Risk Management - Class of 2019

    Master of Public Health specialising in Environmental Health

    The Environmental Health track is intended for those candidates who are interested in understanding the environmental influences on human health, the policy implications, and how to identify, reduce and manage environmental health risks. Candidates will develop an understanding of key environmental health burden of diseases (i.e., chemicals, climate change, indoor and outdoor air pollution and the built environment) with a particular focus on children's environmental health issues. Coursework will prepare candidates to identify suitable interventions from decision makers to community residents.

    Track Convenor: Prof Hanna-Andrea Rother

    Contact Information
    Direct all enquiries to the Programme Administrator, Mrs Tshamani Netshifhefhe

    Further Details
    Download the Environmental Health track flyer and programme brochure for more details.

  • Capacity Building

    The Environmental Health Division is involved in several projects which aim to improve health, particularly for vulnerable populations, through capacity building in the areas of chemicals and pesticides. Further information on these projects is provided below:

    SAICM/UCT Chemical Communities of Practice

    Communities of Practice (CoPs) are voluntary networks consisting of individuals with expertise and interest in a thematic area that come together regularly to exchange and discuss their knowledge and experiences. The four SAICM (Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management)/UCT CoPs were established by the Division of Environmental Health at UCT in collaboration with SAICM, on Emerging Chemical Policy Issues to provide a space for interactive discussions and exchanges of best practices on the sound management of chemicals and waste among SAICM stakeholders.

    In 2020 the following SACIM/UCT chemical CoPs were established (for more information click here):
        - Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHPs)
        - Lead in Paint (LiP)
        - Chemicals in Products (CiP)
        - Chemicals and the Sustainable Development Goals (CSDGs)

    To join any of the Communities of Practice, click here

    For further information regarding each Community of Practice, including digest summaries of discussions from previous meetings, click here.  To view the PowerPoint presentations of each discussion, click here.


    Capacity Building to Promote Pesticide and Chemical Risk Management, Risk Reduction, and Institutional and Regional Cooperation in LMICs

    The Swedish Chemicals Agency (KemI) and the Division of Environmental Health at UCT have embarked on a new three-year capacity building project, particularly for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), to address sustainable chemicals management globally.

    This collaboration is producing outputs under three categories:

    A. The Pesticide Network

    B. Southern African Pesticide Regulators’ Forum (SAPReF) for regional collaboration

    C. The Chemicals Network

     

    A. UCT’s Pesticides Network

    Two key outputs under this network are a weekly newsletter and bi-monthly pesticide discussion online.

     

    1. UCT’s Pesticide weekly newsletter

    The Division of Environmental Health at UCT also produces a weekly newsletter to broadcast pesticide related messages to a wide range of individuals with interests in pesticide issues.

    The intention of this newsletter is to provide a global based forum for information sharing with a particular focus on African countries (e.g., news, articles and incidences), debates, and assisting in problem solving related to pesticides (i.e., questions you may have). The use of "pesticides" throughout the newsletters includes all insecticides, fungicides, nematicides, acaricides, herbicides, biocides etc. If you are interested in receiving this newsletter, kindly subscribe by entering your details in the form
     

    2. UCT’s Pesticide Discussion Forum

     

    The Pesticide Discussion Forum was established in 2009 and aims to encourage in-depth discussions on particular issues with regard to pesticides and the regulation of pesticides globally.

    These sessions are 'presented' by subject matter experts who propose three questions to focus the session. All members are then welcome to respond to the questions posed and to each other’s commentary. The discussion is joined by pesticide regulators, resource stakeholders and experts.

     

    2020 Pesticide Discussion Forum Digests can be accessed here
     

    B. SAPReF
     

    This regional body shares data and works together to improve on the registration, regulation and

    control of pesticides in the region to protect human health and the environment, as well on

    alternatives, biopesticides and the Global Harmonisation System (GHS). SAPReF not only receives support from KemI, but also technical and project support from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), as well as technical and expertise and support from UCT. Additional support has also been provided by the USAID Feed the Future Seed Trade Project.

    SAPReF is led by a steering committee of 6 members selected by the full membership, supported by institutions within the pesticide and environment industry. The steering committee meets virtually every 6-8 weeks and meets annually in person. The current Chair of SAPReF is Botswana, the Vice Chair is Zambia, and the Secretary is Zimbabwe. For more information about SAPReF, go to their website

     

    C. UCT’s Chemicals Network

     

    The Division of Environmental Health (DEH) at the University of Cape Town’s School of Public Health and Family Medicine launched the Chemicals Network in 2020 to facilitate the sharing of knowledge around sound chemicals and waste management and to establish a platform where stakeholders can meet and discuss key issues around sound chemicals and waste management in the hopes of building the capacity of LMIC’s to improve on sound chemicals and waste management practices.

    The Chemicals Network hosts regular online discussions throughout the year that engage network members from all sectors and regions around the world on various topics around chemicals and waste management. These discussions are presented by experts in these areas and are a great opportunity for participants to hear experiences from other countries and organisations as well as share experiences from their own country or organisation. In addition to these discussions, a Chemicals Network Newsletter is sent out before each discussion outlining the topic of the upcoming discussion and some interesting news, articles and opportunities related to the discussion.

    After each discussion, a summary is produced to highlight what was said at the discussion and the key points that can be taken away.

    UCT’s Chemical Network 2020 Discussion digests can be accessed here

    To join the Chemicals Network and subscribe to the Chemicals Network Newsletter, click here

  • Research

    The Division of Environmental Health conducts research on identifying and implementing the most suitable approaches for capacity building of professionals in Low and Middle Income Countries.  These include, yet are not limited to, distance learning, electronic networking and environmental health seminars via the internet.
     

    Possible PhD and Master of Public Health thesis topics to be pursued under the supervision of Division staff include:

    • Pesticides
    • Chemicals: toxicity, exposure assessment, risk assessment and risk management strategies (including endocrine disruption, metals)
    • Environmental pollution including air pollution, hazardous chemicals, contaminated water
    • Interventions and prevention of environmental health risks (implementation science)
    • Improving risk communication of environmental health risks, particularly for low-literate populations (translational science)
    • Environmental health literacy for the general population and health professionals
    • Climate change and health including policy, chemicals and heat stress
    • Environmental health policy analysis nationally, regionally and globally including relevant multilateral environmental agreements
  • Links

  • Staff

    Andrea Rother, Professor and Head of Division

     

    Email:  Andrea.Rother@uct.ac.za

    Phone:  021 406 6721

    Twitter: @harother

    Publications
     

     

    Professor Andrea Rother is an environmental health specialist with over 25 years of research, teaching and policy analysis experience.  Her focus areas include:

    •  chemical/pesticide risk management/governance,
    •  the impact of climate change on health,
    •  developing and evaluating risk communication mechanisms,
    •  understanding risk perceptions,
    •  children’s environmental health,
    •  human rights and environmental health,
    •  building a sustainable medical curriculum and environmental histories, 
    •  innovative capacity building.

    Prof Rother is the convenor of UCT’s Postgraduate Diploma in Pesticide Risk Management and the Master of Public Health Environmental Health Track. Nationally she is a member of government’s Multi-stakeholder Committee on Chemicals Management and the South African Bureau of Standards Pesticide Technical Committee. Prof Rother is also a WHO expert advisor and current chair of the FAO/WHO Joint Meeting on Pesticide Management.

    Aqiel Dalvie, Professor and Director: Centre for Environmental and Occupational Health Research (CEOHR)

     

    Email:  Aqiel.Dalvie@uct.ac.za

    Phone:  021 406 6610

    Publications

     

     

     

    Prof Aqiel Dalvie is the South African Swiss Bilateral SARChi Chair in Global Environmental Health and the Director of the Centre for Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health and Family Medicine. His main research interests is health effects due to endocrine disrupting compounds especially pesticides but also have a keen interest in air pollution, water pollution,  climate change, asthma, toxic metals  and exposure assessment. He also teaches environmental and occupational health.

    Leslie London, Professor and Head of Division: Public Health Medicine

     

    Email:  Leslie.London@uct.ac.za

    Phone:  021 406 6524

    Publications

     

     

     

    Leslie London is a public health specialist with an interest in human rights, public health ethics, farm worker health, prevention of alcohol related harms and the health hazards of pesticides. He is the head of the Division of Public Health Medicine, leads the Health and Human Rights programme and is an active researcher in the Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health Research.  He provides technical support to the provincial XDR TB panel and to the public health functions of the Health Impact Assessment Directorate in the Health Department.

    James Irlam, Senior Lecturer

     

    Email:  James.Irlam@uct.ac.za

    Phone:  021 406 6377

     

     

     

    Teaching & Research Fields
    Evidence-based practice / Primary health care / Climate change and environmental health / Sustainable development / Rural health

    Rebecca Mlelwa, Assistant Lecturer

     

    Email:  rebecca.mlelwa@uct.ac.za

    Phone:  021 404 7661

     

     

    Rebecca Mlelwa is an assistant lecturer in the Division of Environmental Health at the School of Public Health and Family Medicine. She has training in environmental and occupational health.  Ms Mlelwa is co-convening Children’s Environmental Health course and teaches on a Postgraduate diploma in Pesticide Risk Management. She is currently a PhD student; her research focuses on toxic chemicals in childcare products and toys.

    Meryl Jagarnath, nGap Lecturer

     

    EmailMeryl.Jagarnath@uct.ac.za

     

     

     

     

    Dr Meryl Jagarnath has a PhD in Environmental Sciences from the University of KwaZulu-Natal (obtained in 2019). She has a background in both physical and human geography and her research interests lies in studying the interactions and impacts between people and the environment. Dr Jagarnath's doctoral thesis focused on urban climate and heat stress in Durban to identify vulnerable populations that at most at risk of climate change attributed to physical exposure, socio-demographic profiles, and livelihoods and she has published several journal articles from that work. Dr Jagarnath particularly enjoys using spatial tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) to unpack the links between people and the environment from the local to global scale. She has two years post-doctoral experience at the University of Southampton (United Kingdom) working in the Building Research Capacity for sustainable food and water security in sub-Saharan Africa (BRECCIA) project investigating the links between climate vulnerability and food and water insecurity in various dryland communities, with extensive fieldwork experience in rural sub-Saharan Africa.

    Fiona Bennin, Research Co-ordinator

    Email:  fiona.bennin@uct.ac.za

    Phone:  021 404 7661

    Honorary Professor

    Karim Ahmed

    Honorary Senior Lecturers

    Gamini Manuweera
    Mary Miller

    Sheila Willis

    Sheila has over 20 years’ experience working to promote the sustainable management of pests and the reduction of harmful effects of pesticides. She has worked in Africa, the Former Soviet Union and the Caribbean. Her academic background is in Agricultural Zoology / Entomology and she is Head of International Programmes at Pesticide Action Network UK. As a doctoral student Sheila tutored undergraduates in Entomology and Pests and Diseases at Oxford University before working in farmers’ participatory research in Ethiopia and Kenya. More recently Sheila has been concerned with broader aspects of pesticide management, including Highly Hazardous Pesticides, monitoring acute pesticide poisoning and the impact of agroecological practices in cotton and other crops. She also teaches parts of the Post Graduate Diploma in Pesticide Risk Management at the University of Cape Town and has undertaken assignments for UN FAO, UNEP and the secretariats of the chemical conventions.

    Honorary Lecturer

    Christie Godsmark

    Visiting Professors

    Thomas Arcury
    Sara Quandt

    Administrative Staff

    Name Description Email Telephone No
    Vacant Administrative Assistant 021 404 7661
  • Publications

    • Journal articles

    • Chapters in books

    • Risk Communication and Health Promotion Materials

  • Journal articles

    2020

     

    2019

     

    2018

    • Chetty-Mhlanga S, Basera W, Fuhrimann S, Probst-Hensch N, Delport S, Mugari M, Van Wyk J1, Röösli M, Dalvie MA. 2018. A prospective cohort study of school-going children investigating reproductive and neurobehavioral health effects due to environmental pesticide exposure in the Western Cape, South Africa: Study protocol. BMC Public Health 18(1):857.
       
    • Sieber C, Ragettli MS, Brink M, Olaniyan T, Baatjies R, Saucy A, Vienneau D, Probst-Hensch N, Dalvie MA, Röösli M. 2018. Comparison of sensitivity and annoyance to road traffic and community noise between a South African and a Swiss population sample. 2018. Environ Pollut.; 241:1056-1062. (ISI Accredited).
       
    • Sagar S, SM, Struchen B, Loughrand SP, Brunjesi ME, Arangua L, Dalvie MA , Croft RJ, Michael Jerrett M, Moskowitz JM, Kuo T, Röösli M. 2018. Comparison of radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure levels in different everyday microenvironments in an international context. Environment International 114, 297–306.
       
    • Glass T, Dalvie MA, Holtman, Vorster A, MSc, Ramesar RS, London L. 2018. DNA variants and organophosphate neurotoxicity among emerging farmers in the Western Cape of South Africa. Am J Ind Med; 61:11–20.
       
    • Rother Hanna-Andrea. 2018. Pesticide labels: Protecting liability or health? – Unpacking “misuse” of pesticides. Current opinion in Environmental Science & Health, 4:10-15.
       
    • Mathee Angela, Barnes Brendon, Naidoo Shan, Swart Andre & Rother Hanna-Andrea. 2018. Development for children's environmental health in South Africa: Past gains and future opportunities. Development Southern Africa. Pp 1-11.
       
    • Zinyemba C, Archer E, Rother H-A (2018). Climate variability, perceptions and political ecology: Factors influencing changes in pesticide use over 30 years by Zimbabwean smallholder cotton producers. PLOS One, 13(5): e0196901. 
       
    • Chetty-Mhlanga S, Basera W, Fuhrimann S, Probst-Hensch N, Delport S, Mugari M, Van Wyk J, Röösli M, Dalvie MA. 2018. A prospective cohort study of school-going children investigating reproductive and neurobehavioral health effects due to environmental pesticide exposure in the Western Cape, South Africa: Study protocol. BMC Public Health.;18(1):857. (ISI Accredited).
       
    • Sieber C, Ragettli MS, Brink M, Olaniyan T, Baatjies R, Saucy A, Vienneau D, Probst-Hensch N, Dalvie MA, Röösli M. 2018. Comparison of sensitivity and annoyance to road traffic and community noise between a South African and a Swiss population sample. 2018. Environ Pollut.; 241:1056-1062. (ISI Accredited)
       
    • Saucy A, Röösli M, Künzli N, Tsai M, Sieber C, Olaniyan T, Baatjies R, Jeebhay M, Davey M, Flückiger B, Naidoo R, Dalvie MA, Badpa M, and de Hoogh K. 2018. Land Use Regression Modelling of Outdoor NO2 and PM2.5 Concentrations in Three Low Income Areas in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 15, 1452; (ISI Accredited)
       
    • Sagar S, SM, Struchen B, Loughrand SP , Brunjesi ME , Arangua L , Dalvie MA , Croft RJ , Michael Jerrett M, Moskowitz JM, Kuo T, Röösli M. 2018. Comparison of radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure levels in different everyday microenvironments in an international context. Environment International 114, 297–306.
       
    • Glass T, Dalvie MA, Holtman, Vorster A, MSc, Ramesar RS, London L. 2018. DNA variants and organophosphate neurotoxicity among emerging farmers in the Western Cape of South Africa. Am J Ind Med. 2018; 61:11–20. (ISI Accredited). 

     

    2017

    • Olaniyan T, Jeebhay MF, Roosli M, Naidoo R, Baatjies R, Künzli N, Tsai M, Davey M, de Hoogh K, Berman D, Parker B, Leaner J, Dalvie MA. A prospective cohort study on ambient air pollution and respiratory morbidities including childhood asthma in adolescents from the Western Cape province: Study Protocol. BMC Public Health (2017) 17:712, 1-13.
    • Sieber C, Ragettli MS, Brink M, Olaniyan T , Baatjies R, Probst-Hensch N, Dalvie MA, Röösli M. Land Use Regression Modeling of Outdoor Noise Exposure in Informal Settlements in Western Cape, South Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 14, 1262. 
       
    • Sathar F, Dalvie MA, Rother H-A. (2017). Demographic determinants of chemical safety information recall in workers and consumers in South Africa: a cross sectional study. Journal of Safety Research, 63:61-71.
       
    • Walpole S, Vyas, A, Maxwell J, Canny B, Woollard R, Welberby C, Leedham-Green K, Musaeus P, Tufail-Hanif U, Patricio KP, Rother H-A.  (2017). Building an environmentally accountable medical curriculum through international collaboration. Medical Teacher. 
       
    • Hunter-Adams J. and Rother H-A. (2017). A Qualitative study of language barriers between South African health care providers and cross-border migrants. BMC Health Services Research, 17:97.
       
    • Lekei EE, Ngowi AV, London L. Knowledge and practices relating to acute pesticide poisoning among health care providers in selected regions of Tanzania. Environmental Health Insights. 2017 (1-11).
       
    • Lekei E, Ngowi AVF, London L. Acute Pesticide Poisoning in Children: Hospital Review in Selected Hospitals of Tanzania. Journal of Toxicology; 2017: Article ID 4208405, 8 pages, 2017. 


    2016

    • Mwanga HH, Dalvie MA, Singh T, Channa K, Jeebhay MF. Relationship between pesticide metabolites, cytokine patterns and asthma-related outcomes in rural women workers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2016,13(10), 957, 1-14.
       
    • Mao J and Dalvie MA. 2016.  Anthropometric Measurements, Serum Reproductive Hormonal Levels and Sexual Development among Boys in the Rural Western Cape, South Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 13, 1185.
       
    • Mwanga HH, Dalvie MA, Singh TS, Channa K and Jeebhay MF. 2016. Relationship between Pesticide Metabolites, Cytokine Patterns, and Asthma-Related Outcomes in Rural Women Workers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 13, 957.
       
    • F Sathar, M A Dalvie, HA Rother. 2016. Review of the literature on demographic determinants of chemical hazard information recall. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 12, 6281-6299.
       
    • Willems M, Dalvie MA, London L, Rother HA. 2016. Health Risk Perception Related to Fracking in the Karoo, South Africa. Environmental Practice; 18: 1-16. 
       
    • Hunter-Adams J, Landon M. and Rother H-A. (2016). Perceptions related to breastfeeding and the early introduction of complementary foods amongst migrants in Cape Town, South Africa. International Breastfeeding Journal, 11:29.
       
    • Rother H-A.  (2016). Pesticide vendors in the informal sector: trading health for income. New Solutions: A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy, 26(2): 241-252.
       
    • Hunter-Adams J and Rother H-A. (2016). Pregnant in a foreign city: A qualitative analysis of diet and nutrition for cross-border migrant women in Cape Town, South Africa. Appetite, 103: 403-410.
       
    • London L, Kisting S. The Extractive Industries: Can We Find New Solutions to Seemingly Intractable Problems? New Solut 2016; 25:421-430.
       
    • Lekei EE, Ngowi AV, London L. Under-reporting of acute pesticide poisoning in Tanzania: modelling results from two cross-sectional studies. Environ Health. 2016 Nov 29; 15 (1):118.
       

    2015

    • Motsoeneng PM, Dalvie MA. 2015. Relationship between Urinary Pesticide Residue Levels and Neurotoxic Symptoms among Women on Farms in the Western Cape, South Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 12, 6281-6299.
       
    • Andrade-Rivas F, H-A Rother (2015). Chemical exposure reduction: Factors impacting on South African herbicide sprayers’ personal protective equipment compliance and high risk work practices. Environmental Research 142: 34-45.
       
    • Rother H-A (2015). Addressing Pesticide Risk Management and Risk Reduction through Distance Learning Education. Outlooks on Pest Management 26(2):66-71.
       
    • Bennin F, Rother H-A (2015). “But it's just paracetamol”: Caregivers’ ability to administer over-the-counter painkillers to children with the information provided. Patient Education and Counseling 98:331-337.
       
    • Olaniyan TA, Dalvie MA, Jeebhay MF. Ambient air pollution and childhood asthma: A Review of South African epidemiological studies. Current Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 28(2);122-126, 2015.
       

    2014

    • Dalvie MA, Sosan B, Cairncross E, London L. Environmental monitoring of pesticide residues from farms at a neighbouring primary and pre-school in the Western Cape in South Africa.  Science of the Total Environment 2014; 466-467C:1078-1084.
       
    • Harker-Burnhams N, Musekiwa A, Parry C, London L. Do workplace substance abuse prevention programmes include a focus on substance-related HIV risk behaviors: A systematic review. African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies 2013; 12(1): 1-22.
       
    • Ndlovu V, Dalvie MA, Jeebhay MF. Asthma associated with pesticide exposure among women in rural Western Cape of South Africa. Am J Ind Med, 57:1331–1343, 2014. 
    • Myers J, London L, Lucchini RG.  Neurotoxicology and development: Human, environmental and social impacts.  Editorial. Neurotoxicology. 2014 Dec;45:217-9.
       
    • Dalvie MA, Sosan MB, Africa A, Cairncross E, London L.2014. Environmental monitoring of pesticide Residues from farms at a neighbouring primary and pre-school in the Western Cape in South Africa.  Science of the Total  Environment 466–467: 1078–1084.
       
    • Dalvie MA, Rother HA, London L. 2014. Chemical Hazard Communication Comprehensibility in South Africa: Safety Implications for the adoption of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals. Safety Science 61: 51–58.
       
    • Rother, H-A. (2014). Communicating pesticide neurotoxicity research findings and risks to decision-makers and the public. NeuroToxicology 45: 327- 337. 
       
    • Health: deliberations of an international workgroup addressing Lekei EE, Ngowi AV, London L. Farmers' knowledge, practices and injuries associated with pesticide exposure in rural farming villages in Tanzania. BMC Public Health 2014; 14:389.  
       
    • Lekei E, Ngowi AV, London L. Hospital-based surveillance for acute pesticide poisoning caused by neurotoxic and other pesticides in Tanzania. Neurotoxicology 2014; 45: 318–326. 
       
    • Lekei EE, Ngowi AV, London L. Pesticide retailers' knowledge and handling practices in selected towns of Tanzania. Environ Health 2014; 13: 79.
       
    • Dalvie MA. Reproductive health effects of contemporary pesticides used in South Africa. 2014. Research Journal of Chemistry and Environment 18(12).
       
    • Dalvie MA, Africa A, Naidoo S. 2014. Relationship between wood usage and urinary Cr, Cu and As in informal areas of Cape Town. S Afr Med J 2014;104(1):61-64. 
       

    2013

    2012

    • English RG, Perry M, Lee MM, Hoffman E, Delport S, Dalvie MA. 2012. Farm residence and reproductive health among boys in rural South Africa. Environ Int. 47C:73-79.
       
    • London L, Beseler C, BouchardMF, Bellinger DC,Colosio C, Grandjean P, Harari R, Kootbodien T, Kromhout H, Little F, Meijster T, Moretto A, Rohlman DS,Stallones L. Neurobehavioural and neurodevelopmental effects of pesticide exposures. Neurotoxicology 2012; 33: 887–896.
       
    • Roomaney R, Ehrlich R, Rother H-A.  (2012).  The acceptability of rat trap use over pesticides for rodent control in two poor urban communities in south Africa. Environmental Health 11 (1) 32.
       
    • Ehrlich R, Rother HA. The acceptability of rat trap uses over pesticides for rodent control in two poor urban communities in South Africa.  BMC Environ Health 2012. 11:32. 
       
    • Rother H-A. (2012). Improving Poisoning Diagnosis and Surveillance of Street Pesticides.  South African Medical Journal, 102(6): 485-488.

     

    2011

    • Dalvie MA, Naik I, Channa K, London L. 2011. Urinary dialkyl phosphate levels before and after first season chlorpyrifos spraying amongst farm workers in the Western Cape, South Africa. Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part B- Pesticides Food Contaminants and Agricultural Wastes.46 (2), 163-172.
       
    • Haylamicheal ID, Dalvie MA, YirsawBD, Zegeye HA. 2011. Assessing the management of healthcare waste in Hawassa city, Ethiopia. Waste Management & Research. 29(8):854-62doi:10.1177/0734242X10379496.
    • Dalvie MA, Naik I, Channa K, London L. Urinary dialkyl phosphate levels before and after first season chlorpyrifos spraying amongst farm workers in the Western Cape, South Africa. Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part B2011; 46: 163-72.
       
    • Naidoo S, London L, Burdorf A, Naidoo RN, Kromhout H.Spontaneous miscarriages and infant deaths among female farmers in rural South Africa.Scand J Work Envir ealth.2011;37(3):227–236.

     

    2010

    • Bloch K, Roberts C, Glasstone M, Curling L, Rother A, London L, Zar H, Mann M. Pesticide poisonings at a tertiary children's hospital in South Africa: an increasing problem. Clinical Toxicology 2010; 48, 928–934.
       
    • Naidoo S, London L, Rother H-A, Burdorf A, Naidoo RN, Kromhout H. Pesticide safety training and practices in women working in small-scale agriculture in South Africa. OccEnv Med 2010; 67:823-8.
    • Balme K, Roberts C, Glasstone M, Curling L, Rother, HA, London L, Zar H, and Mann M.  (2010). Pesticide poisonings at a tertiary children’s hospital in South Africa: an increasing problem.  Clinical Toxicology 48: 928-934.
    • Naidoo S, London L, Rother H-A, Burdorf A, Naidoo RN, Kromhout H.  (2010). Safety practices and Acetylcholinesterase in women working in small-scale agriculture in South Africa. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 67: 823.828.
    • Rother, H-A (2010). Falling through the regulatory cracks: Street selling of pesticides and poisoning among urban youth in South Africa.  International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, 16(2):202-213.

     

    2009

    • Research Journal of Chemistry and Environment. 13(2):3-4. Dalvie MA, Africa A, London L.  2009. Change in the quantity and toxicity of pesticides sold in South African Crop sectors, 1994 -1999. Environment International 35(4): 683-687.
       
    • Dalvie MA, Africa A, Solomon A, London L, Brower D, Kromhout H.  2009. Pesticide exposure and blood endosulfan levels after first season spray amongst farm workers in the Western Cape, South Africa. Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part B. 44(3):271-7.
       
    • Israel D Haylamicheal, Dalvie MA. 2009. Disposal of obsolete pesticides, the case of Ethiopia (review Article). Environment International.35(3): 667-673.
       
    • Dalvie MA, London L. 2009. Risk assessment of pesticide residues in South African raw wheat Crop Protection. 28(10): 864–869.
       
    • Dalvie MA, Brouwer D, Kromhout H, London L. Pesticide exposure and blood endosulfan levels after first season spray amongst farm workers in the Western Cape, South Africa.  J Environ Sci Health B. 2009 Mar;44(3):271-7.
       
    • Dalvie MA, Africa A, London L. Change in the quantity and acute toxicity of pesticides sold in South African crop sectors, 1994–1999. Environment International 2009; 35: 683–687.
       
    • Dalvie MA, London L. Risk assessment of pesticide residues in South African raw wheat. Crop Protection 2009; 28: 864–869.
       
    • Rother, H-A. (2009). Pesticide Risk Reduction Strategies for Vulnerable African Populations through Regulatory Capacity Building and Gender Appropriate Risk Communication Strategies. Agricultural Innovations for Sustainable Development – Contributions from the Finalists of the African Women in Science Competition, 2(1): 73-78.
    • Dalvie MA, Myers J. 2009. Health effects associated with occupational exposure to hexavalent chrome (chromium VI).  Continuing Medical Education (CME). 27(11):505-506.
    • Tolosana S, Rother HA, London L. Child’s play: Exposure to household pesticide use among children in rural, urban and informal areas of South Africa. S Afr Med J 2009; 99: 180-184.
    • Hanna-Andrea Rother, Vera Ngowi, Leslie London. WAHSA Action on Pesticides - building capacity to reduce hazardous pesticide exposures in the SADC. Occupational Health Southern Africa 2009; 15 (Special WAHSA Issue): 36-45.
       
    • Rother, H-A and London, L.  (2009). Occupational health concerns with pesticides in agriculture and beyond. Continuing Medical Education, 27(11): 506-508.
       
    • Rother H-A, Ngowi V, and London, L.  (2009). WAHSA Action on Pesticides – building capacity to reduce hazardous pesticide exposures in the SADC. Occupational Health Southern Africa.  WAHSA Special Issue November 15: 36-45.

     

    2008

    • Naidoo S, London L, Burdorf A, Naidoo RN, Kromhout H. Agricultural Activities, Crop Production and Pesticide Use among women working in small scale farming in two areas of Northern KwaZulu-Natal, SA. International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 2008;14: 218-224.
       
    • Rother, H-A.  (2008). South African Farm Workers’ Interpretation of Risk Assessment Data Expressed as Pictograms on Pesticide Labels.  Environmental Research, 108(3): 419-427.
    • Rother, H-A, Hall, R. and London, L. 2008. Pesticide Use Among Emerging Farmers in South Africa: Contributing Factors and Stakeholder Perceptions.  Development Southern Africa, 25(4):399-424.
  • Chapters in books

    2020

    • Susan Levine, Alison Swartz and Hanna-Andrea Rother (2020) The whistling of rats: Childhood pesticide poisonings in Cape Town. In Families, Households, Health and Care in Contemporary South Africa. Nolwazi Mkhwanazi and Lenore Manderson (eds) Cape Town, South Africa: HSRC Press. ISBN: 978-0-7969-25875-5
       
    • Godsmark, C.N., Irlam, J (lead author)(2020). The Impact of Extreme Weather Events on Health and Development in South Africa. In Extreme Weather Events and Human Health (pp. 265-278). Springer, Cham.
       
    • Rother, H.A., 2019. Challenges in Pesticide Risk Communication. In: Nriagu, J. (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Environmental Health. Elsevier, vol. 1, pp. 566–576.

     

    2019

    • Rother Hanna-Andrea, Sanjay Wijesekera and Ward Fiona. (2019). The impact of the environment on South Africa’s child and adolescent health: An overlooked health risk. In: Shung-King M, Lake L, Sanders D & Hendricks M (eds). Child and adolescent health - Leave no one behind. South African Child Gauge 2019. Cape Town: Children’s Institute, University of Cape Town.
       
    • Rother Hanna-Andrea, Sabel Clive E and Vardoulakis Sotiris. (2019).
       
    • A Collaborative Framework Highlighting Climate Sensitive Non-Communicable Diseases in Urban Sub-Saharan Africa. In Ramutsindela, Maano and Mickler, David (eds.) Africa and the Sustainable Development Goals. Cham: Springer, ISBN 978-3-030-14856-0.

     

    2018

    • London L. (2018). The Rights to Enjoy the Benefits of Scientific Progress for small farmers facing pesticides hazards. In: (Eds F Zolzer, G Meskens). Environmental Health Risks: Ethical aspects. Routledge, Oxford.

     

    2017

    • Cairncross, E., Dalvie, A., Euripidou, R., Irlam, J. and Naidoo, RN. 2017. Climate Change and Air Pollution: The Impact on Human Health in Developing and Developed Countries. Part 111 Case Studies: Developing Countries/Regions: Chapter 20: Climate Change, Air Pollution and Health in South Africa, 327-347, Editors: Akhtar, R. and Palagiano, C. Springer International Publishing (Springer Climate). No of pages in book: 430.  ISSN 2352-0698. DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-61346-
       
    • Garland, R.M. and Rother, H.A. (2017) Chapter 11: Vulnerability of Human Health Sector to Climate Change. In: Climate Risk and Vulnerability: a Handbook for Southern Africa (2nd Edition). Eds. Davis, C.L and Vincent, K.  SunMedia Press, Stellenbosch, South Africa.
      1. Executive summary
      2. Full book
      3. Summary video


    2016

    • Genthe, B., Maherry, A., Steyn, M., Rother, HA., London, L., and Willems, M. (2016).  Impacts on Human Health. In: Scholes, R., Lochner, P., Schreiner, G., Snyman-Van der Walt, L. and de Jager, M. (eds.). 2016. Shale Gas Development in the Central Karoo: A Scientific Assessment of the Opportunities and Risks. CSIR/IU/021MH/EXP/2016/003/A, ISBN 978-0-7988-5631-7. Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR): Pretoria.
       
    • London L, Willems M. Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Extraction: Public Health Challenges for South Africa. In: Glazewski J, Esterhuyse S. (eds). Proposed Hydraulic Fracturing in the Karoo: Critical Legal And Environmental Perspectives. Pp 323-344. Cape Town: Juta and Co 2016.
    • M.A. Dalvie. 2013. DDT: Health Effects, Reference Module in Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences, Elsevier. 
       
    • Jonathan Elliot Myers, Hanna-Andrea Rother.  Chapter 10: Public Health Impact of and response to climate change in South Africa.  In: “South African Health  Review 2012/13”.  Health Sytems Trust  March 2013.  Durban.
       
    • Rother, H-A.  (2013). Reducing Pesticide Exposure Risks: An Environmental Sociologist’s Role.   In: Korgen KO, White JM and White SK (Eds), Sociologists in Action: Sociology, Social Change and Social Justice (2nd Ed).  New York, NY: Sage.  ISBN #: 9781452203119.

     

    2011

    London L, Joshi TK, Cairncross E and Claudio L. (2011). Environmental Justice: an international perspective. In : Nriagu JO (ed.) Encyclopaedia of Envrionmental Health, volume 2, pp. 441-448 Burlington: Elsevier.

     

    2008

    Rother HA, London L. Classification and Labelling of Chemicals: New Globally Harmonized System (GHS). Encyclopaedia of Pest Management. 1:1, 1-6, Marcel Dekker, Inc, New York, 2008.

  • Risk Communication and Health Promotion Materials

 

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